Posted by: Indonesian Children | January 14, 2009

FREE DOWNLOAD ARTICLES, ASBTRACT, JOURNAL : INTERNET RESOURCES AIDS/HIV in Pregnancy

Bibliography AIDS/HIV in Pregnancy
.This bibliography of 16 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus on the HIV virus and pregnant women. Contact information is the most recent known to the MCH Library. To identify additional materials on this topic, search MCHLine® using our online search form.
The MCH Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

  1. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Perinatal HIV prevention: A survey of the states. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2004. 4 pp. (AMCHP report). Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036; Telephone: (202) 775-0436; Fax: (202) 775-0061; Web site: http://www.amchp.org/; Available at no charge; also available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.amchp.org/aboutamchp/publications/web/phivsurvey.php.This report discusses a survey of state Title V directors conducted by the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs on perinatal HIV prevention, funding and partnerships, primary prevention strategies, barriers and challenges, and technical assistance needs. The report discusses the survey methodology, results, and limitations, and provides conclusions and recommendations. Endnotes are included.
  2. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Perinatal HIV Prevention Action Learning Lab: Lessons learned. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2005. 12 pp. Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036; Telephone: (202) 775-0436; Fax: (202) 775-0061; Web site: http://www.amchp.org/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.amchp.org/aboutamchp/publications/web/phiv-all-lessons-learned.php.This report summarizes the experiences of state teams that participated in the the Association of Maternal and Child Health Program’s Action Learning Lab (ALL) to reduce HIV transmission from mother to child. The purpose of the ALL is to promote collaboration among diverse state programs to address a public health issue. The report presents the experience of ALLs held in several different states. For each state, the following information is provided: a project overview, expected results, a list of key partners, accomplishments, lessons learned, what worked, what didn’t work, and what the team would do differently in the future. Contact information is also supplied.
  3. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Perinatal HIV prevention action learning lab: Lessons learned. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2005. 11 pp. (AMCHP report). Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036; Telephone: (202) 775-0436; Fax: (202) 775-0061; Web site: http://www.amchp.org/; Available at no charge; also available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.amchp.org/aboutamchp/publications/phiv-lessons-learned.pdf.This report discusses the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) -sponsored Action Learning Labs (ALL) to develop action plans to reduce HIV transmission from mother to child. The report records ALL team members’ subjective experiences of their projects. Information is presented for ALLs in eight states: Florida, Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. For each state, the following topics are addressed: (1) project overview, (2) expected results, (3) key partners, (4) accomplishments, (5) lessons learned, (6) what worked, (7) what didn’t, and (8) what would the team do differently in the future. Contact information is also provided. The report concludes with AMCHP observations, results, conclusions, and public health implications.
  4. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Preventing HIV transmission from mother to child. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2004. 2 pp. (AMCHP fact sheet). Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036; Telephone: (202) 775-0436; Fax: (202) 775-0061; Web site: http://www.amchp.org/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.amchp.org/aboutamchp/publications/perinatal%20hiv.pdf.This fact sheet explores the issues involved in eliminating HIV transmission from mother to child, during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. Topics include strategies for preventing perinatal HIV transmission, promising new technology in rapid HIV testing, and how the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs is working with others.
  5. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Toward universal HIV screening for pregnant women. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2007. 2 pp. (Policy brief). Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036; Telephone: (202) 775-0436; Fax: (202) 775-0061; Web site: http://www.amchp.org/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.amchp.org/aboutamchp/publications/HIV%20screening%20for%20pregnant%20women.pdf.This policy brief focuses on progress toward making HIV screening universal for pregnant women. The brief discusses policy milestons related to achieving this goal, the role of maternal and child health, and recommendations. Endnotes are included.
  6. [Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists]. HIV testing in pregnant women. [Washington, DC: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation], 2006. 23 pp. (Issue brief). Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, kaisernetwork.org, 1450 G Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20005; Telephone: (202) 347-5270; Fax: (202) 347-7302; E-mail: use online form at http://www.kaisernetwork.org/static/about_contact.cfm; Web site: http://www.kaisernetwork.org/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.kaisernetwork.org/health_cast/uploaded_files/HIV_Testing_in_Pregnant_Women.pdf.This issue brief focuses on HIV testing in pregnant women. The brief summarizes the issue; provides definitions and background; and discusses the need for testing, the history of HIV testing in pregnant women and policy recommendations, the opt-in and opt-out approaches to HIV testing, and current policies. Concluding recommendations, references, and a timeline of events are included.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mother-to-child (perinatal) HIV transmission and prevention. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007. 5 pp. (CDC HIV/AIDS fact sheet). Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333; Telephone: (404) 639-3534 (Public Inquiries); Telephone 2: (800) 311-3435 (General); E-mail: mailto:%20cdc@cdcinfo.gov%20; Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/perinatal/resources/factsheets/pdf/perinatal.pdf.This fact sheet provides information about mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and how to prevent such transmission. The fact sheet provides an overview of the issue and discusses statistics, risk factors and barriers to prevention, and prevention. Statistical information is presented in figures. References are included.
  8. Edge City Innovations. Creating a circle of care: Comprehensive service delivery to HIV-positive pregnant women and their newborns — A manual on best practices. Lake Ridge, VA: Edge City Innovations, 1998. 67 pp.. Document Number: BPHC PO No. 97-0672(P). This manual provides a guide for developing a program of service delivery to meet the needs of HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. The information is gained from case studies of successful programs of Ryan White CARE Act Title III grantees. It discussed getting women into care, the prenatal to postnatal connection, pediatric services, removing barriers and enhancing services, monitoring the quality of care, coping with managed care, and keys to successful program management. Appendices include a list of case study sites, fact sheets on the Health Resources and Services Administration’s HIV/AIDS Bureau and the Title III Ryan White CARE Act, a glossary of terms, a resource list, and sample forms.
  9. Gilbert, B. C., Johnson, C. H., Morrow, B., Ahluwalia, I. B., Gaffield, M. E., Fischer, L., Rogers, M., and Whitehead, N.. PRAMS 1997 surveillance report: Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. Atlanta, GA: Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1999. 294 pp. Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333; Telephone: (404) 498-1515; Telephone 2: (800) 311-3435; Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp; Available at no charge. This report compiles data from thirteen PRAMS states on a variety of maternal and child health indicators. PRAMS is a population-based survey of women who have recently given birth to a live infant. This survey collects information on women’s experiences and behaviors before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. The report contains statistics on unintended pregnancy and birth control use, prenatal care, Medicaid coverage and WIC participation, breastfeeding, smoking and drinking, hospital stay for labor and delivery, infant placed in intensive care unit, infant sleep position, prenatal HIV counseling and testing, and physical abuse.
  10. Gross, E.. What women need to know: The HIV treatment guidelines for pregnant women. Newark, NJ: National Pediatric and Family HIV Resource Center, 1998. 21 pp. Contact: Women, Children, and HIV, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey P.O. Box 1709 , Newark, NJ 17101-1709; Telephone: (973)972-0400; Telephone 2: (800) 362-0071; Fax: ; E-mail: editor@womenchildrenhiv.org; Web site: http://www.womenchildrenhiv.org/; $4.95. Written in a question and answer format, this guide provides information to women with HIV infection who are pregnant. It discusses therapy recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to improve maternal health and reduce perinatal HIV transmission. A short glossary is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]
  11. Hitti, J. E. and Melvin, A. J.(Eds.). Screening and management of maternal HIV infection: Implications for mother and infant. (Rev. ed.). Seattle, WA: Northwest Regional Perinatal Program and Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington; Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, 2003. 46 pp. Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890; Telephone: (800) 525-0127 (Customer Service); Telephone 2: (360) 236- 4501; Web site: http://www.doh.wa.gov/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/mch/documents/maternal_hiv_web.pdf.This handbook describes best practices to help with the continuing effort to prevent HIV infection in women and infants. Topics include HIV counseling and testing during pregnancy; perinatal transmission risk; diagnostic tests; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s classification of disease; HIV reporting requirements; medications and treatment during pregnancy, labor, delivery and postpartum; newborn treatment; and consultation and referral information. Four appendices provide a resource directory, a listing of local health jurisdictions in Washington state, free regional and national telephone consultation resources, and Web sites. References conclude the handbook.
  12. National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Update for Nutrition During Pregnancy and Lactation: An Implementation Guide. [Arlington, VA]: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1998. 2 pp. Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272; Telephone: (202) 784-9770; Fax: (202) 784-9777; E-mail: mchlibrary@ncemch.org; Web site: http://www.ncemch.org/; Photocopy available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF033. Document URL: http://www.ncemch.org/pubs/default.html#nutrbfeed.This update provides information to supplement the report Nutrition During Pregnancy and Lactation: An Implementation Guide. Topics covered are special recommendations for women before pregnancy; folate intake during pregnancy; calcium; the Maternal Weight Gain Expert Work Group; and HIV, AIDS, and other medical contraindications to breast feeding. A list of publications providing information about maternal nutrition research and projects available form the National Maternal and Child Health Clearinghouse is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]
  13. National Pediatric and Family HIV Resource Center. Guidelines for use of HIV antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy. Newark, NJ: National Pediatric and Family HIV Resource Center, 1998. 2 pp. Contact: Women, Children, and HIV, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey P.O. Box 1709 , Newark, NJ 17101-1709; Telephone: (973)972-0400; Telephone 2: (800) 362-0071; Fax: ; E-mail: editor@womenchildrenhiv.org; Web site: http://www.womenchildrenhiv.org/; Price unknown. This laminated lab coat pocket card is designed to be a quick and easily accessible source of recommendations for antiretroviral therapy to prevent transmission of HIV during pregnancy and for infants exposed to HIV. It is designed with a space to be customized for state or local contact information.
  14. Peck, M. G., Abreasch, C. J., and Simpson, P. S. (Eds.). Profiles of perinatal HIV prevention: Urban communities share their efforts to prevention mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 2005. 44 pp. Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center Department of Pediatrics 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170; Telephone: (402) 561-7500; Fax: (402) 561-7525; E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu; Web site: http://www.citymatch.org/; Available at no charge from the Web site. Document URL: http://webmedia.unmc.edu/community/citymatch/HIV/Profiles%20of%20Perinatal%20HIV%20Prevention.pdf.This publication, which is designed for use by communities as a starting point to implement local systems to prevent perinatal HIV transmission, introduces the Urban Prevention Collaborative (UPC) and the Urban Learning Network, both of which work toward prevention of perinatal HIV transmission. Themes and recommendations from the UPC are presented, along with commentary from City MatCH. A table of prevention strategies is included, and descriptions of programs run by health departments in several states are presented. The publication includes one appendix: a CityMatCH mapping AIDS prevention strategies overview.
  15. Stoto, M. A., Almario, D. A., and McCormick, M. C. (Eds.). Reducing the odds: Preventing perinatal transmission of HIV in the United States. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1999. 397 pp., exec. summ. (21 pp.). Contact: National Academies Press, 500 5th Street, N.W., Lockbox 285, Washington, DC 20055; Telephone: (202) 334-3313; Telephone 2: (888) 624-8373 (Toll Free); Telephone 3: (202) 334-3328 (Director); Fax: (202) 334-2451; E-mail: bkline@nap.edu; Web site: http://www.nap.edu/; $39.95. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHL049; ISBN 0-309-06286-1. This report, written in response to a Congressional request, evaluates state efforts to reduce perinatal transmission of HIV and analyzes the existing barriers to the further reduction in such transmission. This report addresses ways to increase prenatal testing, improve therapy for HIV infected women and children, and generally reduce perinatal HIV infections. The report also considers the ethical and public health issues associated with screening policies as prevention tools, and their implications for prevention and treatment opportunities for women and infants.
  16. U. S. Health Resources and Services Administration, HIV/AIDS Bureau and National Pediatric and Family HIV Resource Center. The Women’s Initiative for HIV Care and Reduction of Perinatal HIV Transmission (WIN): Program findings. [Rockville, MD]: HIV/AIDS Bureau, U. S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 1999. 35 pp. Contact: HRSA Information Center, P.O. Box 2910, Merrifield, VA 22116; Telephone: (888) ASK-HRSA (275-4772); Telephone 2: (877) 489-4772 (TTY); Fax: (703) 821-2098; E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov; Web site: http://www.ask.hrsa.gov/; Available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. HAB00020. This report presents and compares the program survey findings for the Women’s Initiative for HIV Care and Reduction of Perinatal HIV Transmission (WIN), a program to develop and assess replicable models for caring for women with HIV and their children and to advance knowledge and skills in medical and support services delivery. It covers outreach to women of childbearing age. counseling and testing, comprehensive care for pregnant women with HIV including offering ZDV, training local providers, community education for women, consumer involvement, and community advisory boards. It also covers follow-up of women, infants and children; and linking women who have or at risk for HIV with comprehensive services. A list of references is provided. Appendices include a directory of all WIN participant sites; a timeline of WIN activities; and a summary of expertise by WIN site. Statistical data in graphs, tables, and charts is included throughout the report.
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